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TIM 0090-1

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TIM 0090-1
This ticketmachine comes with a box for the electricity. I found it in a cardboardbox at work and don't know anything about it. It is imported by a company called Gelton Electronics in the Netherlands. I searched the internet but can't find the company, I believe it doesn't excist anymore. Who can tell me anything about this ticket machine?
Posted by TheAnt on July 28, 2010 Slideshow

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4 Comments

Reply Frans van de Rivière
4:28 PM on September 3, 2010 
I just wrote a comment at photo 53 and sent it before seeing photo 52 and the comments here, so I'll repeat here, for completeness:
Gelton Electronics of Sleeuwijk was the Dutch TIM importer in the 70s. He placed them mainly at swimming pools and even as machines for check-in tickets at C&A shops, with the 'fare' wheel denoting the number of items checked in to try for size. Where is 'work' where the machine was found? A Swimming pool? To operate the machine by motor, use the right voltage (probably 24 V), or disengage from the motor drive and use a / the handle to turn the machine for ticket issue. The machine looks a bit rusty, so maybe using the electric drive isn't such a good idea!
Reply ticketmachines
6:25 AM on July 29, 2010 
Hi Ant,
There isn't really much information on the T.I.Ms being used as cash registered other than on this site (picture 3 in this gallery).The T.I.M was exported all over the world and not just to transport undertakings as your machine illustrates.
T.I.Ms could be found being used in libraries swimming pools ,golf courses ,canteens,and deck chair hire,cliff lifts etc etc ,due to there easy accounting of different types of admissions.T.I.M reconised there use as non transport machines and actively marketed them for all kinds of different uses,there were also different motor units for these machines (electricity),and your version was manufactured in the U.K and marketed by Gelton.Have you tried to test the machine ?,if there is a maintenance man at your swimming pool why not see if he can get it working,these normally work on 24v so a transformer will be needed ,but check the voltage first as this export unit may be slightly different voltage.
TheAnt says...
Hi 'Ticketmachines',

Thanx for the reply. I think you're right about the leisure department. I found the ticketmachine at work, and I work at the local swimming pool, so I think it is been used as a cash register there. Were these machine also made for that purpose? And do you know where I can find more information about the TIM's beeing used as cash register?
Reply TheAnt
3:24 AM on July 29, 2010 
Hi 'Ticketmachines',

Thanx for the reply. I think you're right about the leisure department. I found the ticketmachine at work, and I work at the local swimming pool, so I think it is been used as a cash register there. Were these machine also made for that purpose? And do you know where I can find more information about the TIM's beeing used as cash register?
Reply ticketmachines
1:23 PM on July 28, 2010 
Hi Ant,
This is a British made T.I.M ticket machine and seems to be a late example from the late 1960s early 1970s ,and i would say that it is not a bus machine due to there being no stage dial present and also the letters on the fare dial this machine could have been used for issuing tickets for leisure departments or even railways.it also has the motor unit which is a nice addition,valuation wise this would be worth around £30/£45 on the British market due to it being untested.Thank you Ant for uploading these pictures .